TRANSLATIONAL IMAGING CORE

The Translational Imaging Core (TIC) at the Department of Radiology provides state of the art Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT), Computed Tomography (CT), and Bioluminescent/Fluorescent imaging that supports cutting edge animal research with the potential to translate to improved health care for the military and civilian populations. TIC has been an integral tool the forefront of research of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and has also contributed heavily in assessment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Hypobaric Hypoxia, neurotoxins, Filariasis, Australian Bat Lyssavirus (ABLV), and many other conditions and diseases.

TIC collaborates heavily with the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) as well as the National Institute of Health (NIH), Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Georgetown University and others, and the core has advanced, highly trained and experienced personnel that are leading experts in their imaging fields.

 

"The combination of our personnel’s expertise and knowledge, the facilities cutting edge imaging equipment and data analysis, and the ability to work directly with the military’s most interesting and vital medical research make the Translational Imaging Core a truly remarkable resource for USU students and faculty."

VINCENT B. HO, M.D., M.B.A.
CHAIR, DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY

A Few of Our Partners

 

The small animal 7T MRI has the capacity for a diverse set of basic and advanced structural and functional sequences and acquisitions. Some of these include qualitative and quantitative T1, T2, diffusion, perfusion imaging, and contrast agent imaging. Advanced MRI methods our MRI team is developing also allow for the observation of physical parameters on the micron scale to be evaluated such as cellular and tissue integrity, inflammation, cellular infiltration, and micro blood flow.

The small animal PET/SPECT can use many different molecular imaging probes like FDG which can access regional cellular metabolism. Nuclear imaging can provide an important look into the molecular process as they happen in life. This technology can compare interesting biochemical process in fields such as inflammation, tau and amyloid beta accumulation, angiogenesis, neurotransmitter uptake and transport and proliferation with extremely high sensitivity.

Our facility also has two high resolution CT machines for in vivo studies and one for ex vivo samples to provide precise detail of structural anatomy in studies such as bone disorders, fetal malformation, and genetic fruit fly studies.

The Translational Imagining Core also has optical imaging capabilities including bioluminescence and fluorescence. Bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging are widely used molecular imaging techniques which can be used in vivo in mice and rats and to examine tissue slices, which in turn provide useful information that can been used to track the progression of virus and bacterial pathogens as well as the immune responses in a variety of conditions.

The combination of our personnel’s expertise and knowledge, the facilities cutting edge imaging equipment and data analysis, and the ability to work directly with the military's most interesting and vital medical research make the Translational Imaging Core a truly remarkable resource for USU students and faculty.